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No Knead Skillet Olive Bread

122 Responses
  1. Hunter Jay Smith

    I have made this twice with excellent results. The second time I did not use olives as my husband won’t eat them. I replaced the olives with a cup of Parmesan cheese and 1/4 cup of basil leaves, and kept the garlic powder measurement the same. It was delicious but without the garlic from the olives in the original, I think it would benefit from more and I will double that next time. Still, absolutely the best bread I have ever made. I used a double walled loaf pan and increased the cooking time. No one could tell it was “no knead” bread. The texture was light and fine; not dense.

  2. Jeannine

    I’ve made this bread now several times, I used kalamata olives and a mixture of different olives. It was delicious every time i made it! Quick and easy for a bread. When you first take it out of the pan it does feel like it isn’t cooked all the way if you cut it immediately. Let it sit for awhile out of the pan and it should be fine. I am making another batch as I write this! A keeper for sure!

  3. Christine

    Made this today, turned out great ,I did change it a bit.I used cheddar cheese and minched garlic. My whole house smelled wonderful.

  4. Lutz Rahe

    Hi

    I would try this recipe, but with “4-1/3 cups all-purpose flour , divided” I can´t “work”. I will need a bit wmore details. Which flour and how many (in gram) of this?
    Teaspoons I can work with……..but cups? There are so many different sizes of cups noutside…

    1. William Myers

      A cup is a specific unit of measurement of volume in Western cooking (Imperial measurement system). A cup is 8 fluid ounces… which is equivalent to 236.588 milliliters. Two cups is a pint, four cups is a quart, four quarts is a gallon. Teaspoon is 4.93 ml, Tablespoon is 14.79 ml. Cooking rarely measures by weight but when it does, you can use 1 Imperial ounce = 28 grams… ie. a 4 ounce steak (or a 1/4 pound burger) would be 112 grams of beef before cooking.

    2. FlourPower

      Bakers very often use WEIGHT rather than volume when measuring for more consistent results. In this case, the 4 1/3 cups of flour would weigh 522 grams. Good luck!

  5. Yeast can be frozen- I’ve had mine for 3+ years. Stored in a plastic jar (JIF Peanut Butter). I just take out what I need – let it come to room temp and go from there. I buy mine from a restaurant supply store because it comes in 1 pound packages. Everything comes out just fine. Yeast is a ‘living organism’ which is why there is an expiration date on the package…you can try and use expired yeast….and have the best flatbread you’ve ever made.

    1. Nancy Cole

      I made this today, followed the instructions,, baked in a stones are dish. Baked it 35 minutes. When I turned it out it was not cooked! Half came out, all doughy! I put it back in the dish and baked it 25 minutes. It’s pretty much cooked but real dense! The taste is good but doesn’t much resemble bread shown! Oh well, I’ll try it again hopefully! What went wrong? Thanks.

  6. Pam Carter

    Just took it out if oven.I used Kalamata olives.Its really tasty but needed more time in oven.I will try again til I get it right and that includes not burning my hand on the skillet.

  7. Stella Saracco Garofalo

    I made the bread in a cast iron Dutch oven without the cover as instructed. I put in mild muffuletta Sicilian style and a few Spanish olives and added some basil instead of the marinated olives. Since the top was not brown yet, I baked it for about 40 minutes and it came out great. My husband loved it and I WILL MAKE AGAIN.

        1. LindaK

          I’m thinking that you could do it on the dough cycle, then bake in the skillet. As usual, first add all the wet ingredients, dry ingredients next (including herbs and garlic), yeast in a “well” on the top. Add the olives when the machine signals to add mix-ins. When done rising on the dough cycle, go to Step 6 of the recipe and finish from there.

          My only concern is that this is no-knead bread and the dough cycle will knead for about 30 minutes on my machine. I’m not sure if kneading will be a problem.

  8. I’m taking a month off of all grains, assuming I can actually do it, but this bread will be the first one I make when the month is done. I love everything about it, but especially that you made it in a skillet.

  9. Deborah Howlett

    I’ve made this a few times and it is delish! I like to sprinkle some cornmeal on the olive oil in the skillet before placing the dough in it. It makes for an extra special crunchy crust!

  10. Debra Rich

    Hi. Made this bread and only had a 12″ cast skillet. didn’t seem to rise at all and didn’t get brown on top ( just on the bottom). Good flavor but more like a flat bread. Yeast wasn’t old. What happened?

  11. Joycelyn

    Many thanks for the great recipe, has been printed and will be made tomorrow.
    That said, your site/page has to have the most ads I’ve ever come across leaving trying to read without yet another ad appearing, almost impossible.

  12. Veronique

    This recipe looks delicious. I’m trying it gluten free with my whole wheat gluten free flour substitute. It obviously has no whole wheat in it, but just yields the texture of whole wheat flour. I had to make a few adjustments, so if it turns out successfully I’ll share it here. Right now it is in the process of rising in my kitchen 🙂 keeping fingers crossed. Smells divine already.

      1. Veronique

        I’m giving this recipe 5 stars because I can see that the flavor is terrific.
        Baking gluten free bread is tough. So here’s what happened with my attempt, it turned out to be under cooked. 🙁 I baked it at 450 for 50 minutes, then tented it with foil to prevent it from getting too dark, and continued baking at 400 for another 20 minutes. However after cooling, I sliced it and it was quite gummy towards the bottom of the loaf. Where I went wrong, I think, is I may have added too much yeast, because the bread dough texture changed a lot after rising, so much so that I could not make a disc shaped loaf that would hold it’s shape. This made it necessary for me to cook it in a corningware oven safe baking dish, I think that was a problem too prohibiting it from cooking properly on the bottom of the loaf. Also the reason I think I may have used too much yeast is because the bread’s top crust separated from the loaf. I tried to save it my returning it to the oven in hopes of cooking it out. It’s a bit too brown now and certainly the crumb of the bread is very poor. But still taste good. I’ll try again 🙂 Here is the altered recipe I used….

        Ingredients
        2 cups lukewarm water (105-degrees Fahrenheit)
        1 tablespoon active dry yeast
        1 tsp sugar
        1 1/2 teaspoons salt
        4-3/4 cups Whole Wheat Gluten-Free Flour Substitute divided
        1 cup green olives, whole or coarsely chopped
        2 cloves garlic minced
        2 tablespoon dried basil
        2 tablespoons Olive Oil , divided
        coarse salt
        dried oregano

        this is the substitute flour recipe I used which I found on the Serious Eats website- It’s worked great for me in other recipes.
        Ingredients
        350 grams arrowroot flour
        350 grams sorghum flour
        450 grams tapioca starch
        450 grams white rice flour (or substitute millet flour)
        200 grams brown rice flour (or substitute sorghum flour)
        100 grams potato flour
        200 grams milk powder (I used Myers Goat Milk Powder)
        20 grams guar gum

        Directions
        Whisk together all the ingredients in a bowl. Store in airtight container at room temperature for up to 6 months.

        1. Jo

          Yep. I, too, used a ceramic dish and it was very hard to get it out of the dish and was slightly underdone. Plus, I might have used a slightly smaller dish than recommended. It is edible and I think with the proper skillet, it’ll be great!

  13. Terre

    I made this today and was worried that the dough was too sticky but I followed the recipe and it turned out great! I only had a 10 inch iron skillet and that worked out just fine! I paired it with a lentil soup and it was a huge hit! Thanks for sharing.

    1. Teresa

      I just moved mine from the bowl to the skillet and had to pour it. Not soupy bt not handleable. The yeast is definitely working in it and the 8 inch skillet is very full. What’s wrong?

  14. Susan Mayer

    Made this today, followed the recipe almost exact, except used the green olives I had at home and used Italian seasoning on top and in the dough mix. AWESOME!!!!! Smells so good baking and tastes so good. Got nice snd brown on the outside, and looks so professional. Will absolutely make this again! Thanks for the recipe!

  15. Mary

    Probably a silly question but new to baking ANY kind of bread, but can any type of olives be used and do they need to be in a marinade?

  16. Rachael

    Hi! I made this and it was a hit with my family…question is this…..has anyone tried it in a traditional loaf pan instead of a skillet? If so, which size and did you later the baking time? I’d like to use the bread for sandwiches. Thoughts? The recipe is incredible!!

    1. Karen R Heighway

      you can copy and paste into a word document or in an email and print it from there. I am adding it to my evernote recipe collection with the evernote clipper.

  17. Cindy

    Just made this and my kitchen smells wonderful! Next time I’ll use a larger iron skillet…I used an 8-inch…Just would like the bread to be a flatter version. But it’s delicious and will definitely make it again!

  18. Dewayne

    I have a pot of black eyed peas with a Huge ham hock cooking in the Instand Pot. Roasting some cabbage. Making this bread right now. Happy New Year!!

    1. Hi! Pretty much any bowl will do, but I know a lot of bread makers that will only use ceramic bowls. I, on the other hand, use my stainless steel bowls, and I set them over my stove where it’s warmer. I hope that helps. 🙂

  19. Jemma

    Hi there! This looks great, however I am questioning the flour measurement? I read it as 4 x 1/3 cups of flour and it is not so much a dough as a runny batter!? Is this right? Surely the recipe isn’t for 4 cups of flour??

    1. Jemma

      Baked it anyway and definitely not right! Was in the oven for an hour and still gooey on the inside. We ate the crust anyway and it was DELICIOUS! Will need to try this again but alter flour measurements! Thanks!

    1. Jackie

      NO, not a good one for the bread machine. Since you’re only stirring the ingredients togethernuntil they’re combined, you only work the dough for a minute or two, it takes about the same amount of time as mixing pancake batter together. If your hands are really bad you probably could use a hand mixer or stand mixer on a very low setting. It should not take more than a minute or two to bring the dough together. I’ve made this recipe a few times and I too have problems with my hands so I often use my bread maker on the dough setting

  20. I baked this loaf of bread today, the aroma was wonderful. I followed your directions exactly, and the results were tastefully delightful. It has become an instant hit in my home, thank you for sharing!

    Regards’ , Mary E Hill

  21. Shirley Davis

    I don’t often read the pages the writer publishes with the recipe but started with yours and was delighted! Read every word and will follow – you write well and with enthusiasm – loved reading it – thank you – oh, and I am on a low salt diet but will eat this bread anyway!!!!!

  22. Jane

    Made this on the weekend and totally loved it. Used black olives, herbs and olive oil. Pitting the olives was a pain, so will use pitted olives or Sun Dried Tomato as suggested. Baked in stoneware pie plate and came out great. After a couple of days, when it was getting stale and spongy, I toasted a lice in the toaster. Will make it again.

    1. HI! Please just make sure that your pan is oven safe for the suggested high temperature. Also, while this will likely work fine with a normal cake pan, it may not develop the same kind of crispy exterior that it might with cast iron skillet.

  23. Gina

    I’m making this now. I’m using a cast iron loaf pan, rather than a cast iron skillet. I just wanted the loaf to rise a bit higher than the height of the skillet. It’s rising now, and it smells lovely! I can’t wait to get it into the oven! I’m sure it’ll smell even better, then!

    1. Hi! I think with that kind of a skillet – assuming that it’s wider? Mine definitely is – the bread may come out almost flat. Again, this depends on the size of the skillet and its depth. It’s up to you. You can definitely use it.

  24. Jane Deguara

    I Have just made this today.. smells absolutely lovely, i used a non stick dish which took about 45 mins to cook perfect….. thank you for the recipe.
    regards
    Jane

  25. Jacque

    I just made this and it is beautiful and delicious. I regularly bake bread, and I followed your very clear directions exactly as written. I’m serving for dinner tonight with a lovely Acorn Squash Soup. Thank you so much for your recipe, I will be adding it to my Bread file.

    PS I don’t understand why all of the comments are about altering your original recipe. (?)

    1. Yulie

      Hi, I just made this tonight. It is great! I did add some Parmesan and mozzarella (about 1/2 cup total), and it gave it great flavor. I also baked it in an oval (10 x 14) calphalon pan and it cooked just fine.

  26. Mary Ellen Sastre

    do you need to activate the yeast first as it says on the yeast package? my sister just added it to the water called for in the recipe and she said it did not rise as it should have

    1. Dee

      A few times I’ve been caught out that the ‘new’ packet of yeast I have purchased is close to expiry and isn’t as active as it should be. I now always check expiry dates of the yeast I buy. I always store my yeast in the freezer because it lasts longer. I also bloom my yeast with lukewarm water and half a teaspoon of sugar for five to ten minutes. If it doesn’t bubble and form the foamy yeast cover at the top of the water, it gets thrown and I start again.

    1. It will work so long as the dish can handle high heat, and because it’s in a baking dish and not a cast iron skillet, you may have to bake it longer or raise the temperature by about 25 degrees to get the same outcome.

  27. Sharon

    Will this be good without the addition of olives, as just a plain bread? We don’t like olives! Also, will a nonstick pan work? Thanks.

    1. Yep! You can definitely leave out the olives. A different pan or dish will work so long as the dish can handle high heat, and because it’s not in a cast iron skillet, you may have to bake it longer or raise the temperature by about 25 degrees to get the same outcome.

  28. Cheryl

    I am the only one who eats olives. What would happen if I left them out? Is there something I could substitute? Maybe sun dried tomatoes?

  29. Carolyn

    Most glass containers and Corning Ware cannot withstand the high temps for this bread and may explode in your oven. Please do not use unless you know that it will work for temp for the time required. Just an FYI….

  30. I made this using all whole wheat flour and it turned out great. Couldn’t find olives listed at any of our stores, so I used garlic stuffed olives and added my own basil. I have a question, though. What is the purpose of scoring? I had a beautiful pan of dough that was puffy in the center, and as soon as scored it, it fell where I scored it. I thought it would puff back up in the center after I baked it, but it did not. It remained flat.

    1. Hi Melissa!! I tried it with half whole wheat flour and half all purpose flour… the texture was way off. I just didn’t care for it, but if you want to give it a go, please, if you have a minute, report back and let me know how it went! I’d love to know.

  31. I would really like to make this, but all I have is a 12-inch cast iron skillet. Would it work to just increase the amount of each ingredient by 50% to account for the larger pan, or would that throw off the recipe?

      1. Hi Katerina,
        Thanks for this awesome recipe! I tried what Alex suggested (above), increasing the ingredients and baking time, and using a 12-inch skillet. I also used a mix of green and black I had on hand. I think this is the most flavorful bread I’ve made! Mine didn’t turn out as pretty as yours, I think because I scored it too much. Anyway, it’s soooo delicious, my husband liked it, too, and we had it for our ‘dinner’ last night. 🙂 Thank you so much!

  32. I made this bread for the first time today. Easy to follow recipe, looks beautiful, nice and golden brown, however, the inside is not done all the way through. Still a bit doughy. 30 minutes at 400. Top was perfectly brown. I know the answer is more time in the oven, but I don’t want he outside to get overly brown. Suggestions ?

    1. Hi Joann!! All ovens do cook/bake at different times/temps so possibly a little more time would have helped, but I would also make an aluminum foil ‘tent’ to shield the crust, and then return it to the oven. After the bread has browned, remove it from the oven, place the tent-foil over, and then return it to the oven to finish baking. Also, was the bread cool enough when you cut into it? Sometimes just giving it a bit of time to cool down will take care of the moisture inside. I hope this helps! Happy Holidays!!

  33. Robert Erickson

    Hi. I made this today and I have some questions. I didn’t have the Star olive mix suggested but used a cup of olives and homegrown garlic and basil. The recipe rose nicely but when I moved it to the skillet, it was less of a dough and more like batter. It held together but filled the 8″ skillet completely. After sitting before baking, it overlapped the edges of the skillet and then did the same in the oven. In short, is the dough supposed to be firm or loose and should I have cut back on the water and flour for an 8″ pan? Oh, it tastes fine; I just wasn’t;t expecting it to act the way it did.

    1. Hi Robert!! The 8 inch skillet is fine, and yes, the dough should fill up the skillet.
      Also, was it warm where you left the dough to rise? Speaking from experience, what might have happened is that the room was too warm for the dough and it rose much faster, which is why it went over the edges. I’m thinking the same reason – temperature – for why the dough thinned out. Let me know if this helps. Have a great night ahead!

    2. Elissa

      Mine did the same thing t rose just too big to fill in the skillet. So I had a 12 inch skillet but that was too big. So I used my copper pot instead. It took 50 minutes instead of 35, but it did it’s job. And when it came out it looked like something from a restaurant. It was nice and square. I think you could use anything as long as it’s oven safe and watch for adjusted cooked times. But if you use an 8 inch square or round pan I would fit it on a baking sheet Incase there is spillover. I just used whatever olives they had at the grocery store and tweaked it with some cracked pepper, red pepper flakes and rosemary and didn’t measure any of the seasoning just the yeast, flour and water and it came out spectacular. I’m telling you this because mine was also a mush instead of a firm dough but I think that has something to do with the fact that you don’t knead it.

    1. Hi Debbie! So this type of bread turns out best if made in a cast iron skillet, stoneware, and/or in a dutch oven. The glass pie dish definitely won’t work, and I’m not completely sure about the corningware. I hope that helps!

    1. Hi Pat! There is a gluten-free all purpose flour blend recipe that I got from the book “Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day”, and it works perfectly, cup for cup.

      GF Flour Blend:

      6 cups white rice flour
      3¼ cups sorghum flour
      1¾ cups tapioca starch/flour
      1¼ cups potato starch
      ¼ cup xanthan gum or ground psyllium husk

      1. Mix all ingredients together very thoroughly in a lidded 5- to 6-quart container using a spoon or a Danish dough whisk. If your lid is sealed tightly, pick up the container and shake it vigorously for quick and complete blending.

      2. Store in a cool, dry place.

    1. Hi Shea! I have this Homemade Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Blend that you can try. It’s from the book “Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day”. I hope this helps!

      6 cups white rice flour
      3¼ cups sorghum flour
      1¾ cups tapioca starch/flour
      1¼ cups potato starch
      ¼ cup xanthan gum or ground psyllium husk

      1. Mix all ingredients together very thoroughly in a lidded 5- to 6-quart container using a spoon or a Danish dough whisk. If your lid is sealed tightly, pick up the container and shake it vigorously for quick and complete blending.

      2. Store in a cool, dry place.

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Katerina

I'm a cookie-maker, baker-faker & picture-taker! For me, eating is a moment to share, an enjoyment, a passion. I hope you enjoy my recipes!

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